Tag: Washtenaw CTA

August Gathering

August Gathering

August progressive and inclusive community gathering. We will be meeting at Pavilion #1 at Lillie Park North in Ann Arbor for a picnic/liturgy.

Theme: TBA

July Gathering

July Gathering

July progressive and inclusive community gathering. We will be meeting at Pavilion #1 at Lillie Park North in Ann Arbor for a picnic/liturgy.

Theme: TBA

June Gathering

June Gathering

June progressive and inclusive community gathering. We will be meeting at Pavilion #1 at Lillie Park North in Ann Arbor for a picnic/liturgy.

Theme: TBA

Seekers Book Discussion – How to be Perfect

Seekers Book Discussion – How to be Perfect

From Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/How-Be-Perfect-Correct-Question/dp/1982159316/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1649512461&sr=1-1

From the creator of The Good Place and the cocreator of Parks and Recreation, a hilarious, thought-provoking guide to living an ethical life, drawing on 2,400 years of deep thinking from around the world.

Most people think of themselves as “good,” but it’s not always easy to determine what’s “good” or “bad”—especially in a world filled with complicated choices and pitfalls and booby traps and bad advice. Fortunately, many smart philosophers have been pondering this conundrum for millennia and they have guidance for us. With bright wit and deep insight, How to Be Perfect explains concepts like deontology, utilitarianism, existentialism, ubuntu, and more so we can sound cool at parties and become better people.

Schur starts off with easy ethical questions like “Should I punch my friend in the face for no reason?” (No.) and works his way up to the most complex moral issues we all face. Such as: Can I still enjoy great art if it was created by terrible people? How much money should I give to charity? Why bother being good at all when there are no consequences for being bad? And much more. By the time the book is done, we’ll know exactly how to act in every conceivable situation, so as to produce a verifiably maximal amount of moral good. We will be perfect, and all our friends will be jealous. OK, not quite. Instead, we’ll gain fresh, funny, inspiring wisdom on the toughest issues we face every day.

May Gathering

May Gathering

May progressive and inclusive community online gathering.

Theme: TBA

Seekers Book Discussion – How to be Perfect

Seekers Book Discussion – How to be Perfect

From Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/How-Be-Perfect-Correct-Question/dp/1982159316/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1649512461&sr=1-1

From the creator of The Good Place and the cocreator of Parks and Recreation, a hilarious, thought-provoking guide to living an ethical life, drawing on 2,400 years of deep thinking from around the world.

Most people think of themselves as “good,” but it’s not always easy to determine what’s “good” or “bad”—especially in a world filled with complicated choices and pitfalls and booby traps and bad advice. Fortunately, many smart philosophers have been pondering this conundrum for millennia and they have guidance for us. With bright wit and deep insight, How to Be Perfect explains concepts like deontology, utilitarianism, existentialism, ubuntu, and more so we can sound cool at parties and become better people.

Schur starts off with easy ethical questions like “Should I punch my friend in the face for no reason?” (No.) and works his way up to the most complex moral issues we all face. Such as: Can I still enjoy great art if it was created by terrible people? How much money should I give to charity? Why bother being good at all when there are no consequences for being bad? And much more. By the time the book is done, we’ll know exactly how to act in every conceivable situation, so as to produce a verifiably maximal amount of moral good. We will be perfect, and all our friends will be jealous. OK, not quite. Instead, we’ll gain fresh, funny, inspiring wisdom on the toughest issues we face every day.

April Gathering

April Gathering

April 2022 progressive and inclusive community online gathering.

Theme: TBA

March Gathering

March Gathering

March 2022 progressive and inclusive community online gathering.

Theme: TBA

February Gathering

February Gathering

February 2022 progressive and inclusive community online gathering.

Theme: TBA

Seekers Book Discussion – “The Truth at the Heart of the Lie”

Seekers Book Discussion – “The Truth at the Heart of the Lie”

From Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Truth-Heart-Lie-Catholic-Church/dp/0593134702/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2PVAJ6AGZCXBJ&keywords=the+truth+at+the+heart+of+the+lie&qid=1642702021&sprefix=the+truth+at+the%2Caps%2C116&sr=8-1

“Courageous and inspiring.”—Karen Armstrong, author of The Case for God

“James Carroll takes us to the heart of one of the great crises of our times.”—Stephen Greenblatt, author of The Swerve

An eloquent memoir by a former priest and National Book Award–winning writer who traces the roots of the Catholic sexual abuse scandal back to the power structure of the Church itself, as he explores his own crisis of faith and journey to renewal

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

James Carroll weaves together the story of his quest to understand his personal beliefs and his relationship to the Catholic Church with the history of the Church itself. From his first awakening of faith as a boy to his gradual disillusionment as a Catholic, Carroll offers a razor-sharp examination both of himself and of how the Church became an institution that places power and dominance over people through an all-male clergy.

Carroll argues that a male-supremacist clericalism is both the root cause and the ongoing enabler of the sexual abuse crisis. The power structure of clericalism poses an existential threat to the Church and compromises the ability of even a progressive pope like Pope Francis to advance change in an institution accountable only to itself. Carroll traces this dilemma back to the Roman Empire and the Middle Ages, when Scripture, Jesus Christ, and His teachings were reinterpreted as the Church became an empire. In a deeply personal re-examination of self, Carroll grapples with his own feelings of being chosen, his experiences as a priest, and the moments of doubt that made him leave the priesthood and embark on a long personal journey toward renewal—including his tenure as an op-ed columnist at The Boston Globe writing about sexual abuse in the Church.

Ultimately, Carroll calls on the Church and all reform-minded Catholics to revive the culture from within by embracing anti-clerical, anti-misogynist resistance and staying grounded in the spirit of love that is the essential truth at the heart of Christian belief and Christian life.